Chinese Muslims observe Corban Festival
The Corban Festival is also known as Eid al-Adha or feast of the sacrifice, when Muslims slaughter lambs to feed to the hungry. Muslims in northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region usually go to mosques at sunrise to attend their largest religious service of the year.The majority of Xinjiang's 10 million religious followers believe in Islam. There are around 24,000 mosques in the region.
Muslims shop for embroidered cloth before the Corbon Festival
Muslims shop for embroidered cloth in the run-up to the Eid al-Adha festival in Altay, northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, Oct. 24, 2012. The Eid al-Adha, also known as the Festival of Sacrifice, is an important Muslim holiday. This year's Eid al-Adha falls on Oct. 26.
Muslims buys snacks to celebrate the Corban Festival
Muslims ususally buy snacks ahead of the Corban Festival, or Eid al-Adha. Sanzi, a traditional snack, is a favorite food of Hui ethnic group. The festival brought in a lot of business.
Lambs sold well before the Corban Festival
Corban Festival features family gatherings with lamb as the main dish.On streets, lambs were being loaded onto vehicles.Yijiati, a trader said he drove 400 lambs to a market in Shengli Road on Thursday, as the animals were being sold for the festival. By Friday, there were only a few dozen left.The government has also made preparations to make sure the market has enough supply of lamb and beef.
Actors of Uygur ethnic group perform ahead of the Corban Festival
Actors of Uygur ethnic group perform in front of a bazaar ahead of the Corban Festival, or Eid al-Adha, in Urumqi, capital of northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, Oct. 25, 2012. The Eid al-Adha, also known as the Festival of Sacrifice, is an important Muslim holiday. This year's Eid al-Adha falls on Oct. 26.
 
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